In Episode 81 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on October 20, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Lauren Selman, founder of Reel Green Media, an environmental consulting and production company dedicated to greening the entertainment industry both on and off screen.

Lauren Selman of Reel Green Media

Lauren Selman of Reel Green Media

Reel Green Media started as a student project when Selman was at UC Berkeley. The company’s first movie project was Benjamin Bratt’s La Mission, which was filmed in San Francisco.  Selman initially zeroed in on composting and recycling movie set waste.  For example, the 80-person La Mission crew was going through as many as 500 disposable water bottles a day.  Selman substituted water jugs.  She then analyzed the energy used, including studying generators, transportation, hotel accommodations and caterers.  In addition, she consulted on whether the products that appeared on screen were environmentally friendly and promoting a green lifestyle.  In addition to movies, Reel Green Media now works on live events, such as the Golden Globes, the Emmys and the Oscars.

Selman also set out to reimagine beauty pageants, competing for the Miss Malibu title in a completely sustainable way with, for example, an all-organic dress and makeup.  She won the pageant’s Miss Congeniality title and the People’s Choice Award and influenced the way other contestants approached sustainability.

Bill and Selman discuss how greening the entertainment industry requires re-thinking basic concepts. For example, it’s not always easy to quickly get things – such as compostable plates – to remote areas where movies often film.  But studios are getting more on board with sustainable practices and both production structures and executives’ awareness is developing.  That, Selman says, will have ripple effect to entertainment industry vendors.

Are you more likely to see a movie that used sustainable practices in filming?
Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Selman: Episode 81 of The Wendel Forum (27:41 mins; mp3)

Reel Green Media: http://www.reelgreenmedia.com

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

In Episode 59 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on April 14, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show host Dick Lyons welcomes Morris Shriftman, a brand strategist for natural foods and green products, and CEO of Mozart, Inc. (A classical music fan, Morris’ company name carries the name of the great composer and is a double entendre on his name: “Mo’s Art.”)  He also serves on the board of the American Botanical Council, which provides consumers with credible information about plants and herbs used in natural medicine.

Morris Shriftman of Mozart Inc. visits The Wendel Forum studio

Morris Shriftman of Mozart Inc. visits The Wendel Forum studio

A marketing expert, Morris has been focused on the natural food and alternative medicine industry since 1970.  He began as brand consultant in New York.  In the 70’s, he met the founders of Tree of Life and was hired as vice president of marketing, where, he says, he gained a “360 degree perspective” on the wellness industry, handling product creation, development, manufacturing, packaging, distribution, marketing and retail partnerships.

Tree of Life became both a major national distributor of natural products and had its own line of branded natural products.  Among other things, Morris designed the well-known “Tree of Life” logo.  In 1985, when Tree of Life was sold, he founded Mozart, Inc., which “creates products and builds brands for companies doing the right thing, including using healthy ingredients, removing objectionable ingredients and having the courage to be transparent.”

Dick and Morris discuss how natural products companies can communicate their message to retailers and consumers, a particular challenge for smaller, undercapitalized companies that can’t afford the marketing practices of larger companies, such as product placements, public relations, trade advertising, events marketing or consumer advertising.  Those companies have to be inventive, Morris says.

Fortunately, social network marketing is an inexpensive way to reach a narrow audience of people who share similar values, what Morris calls “narrowcasting” (as opposed to broadcasting). Better than a new logo or slogan, narrowcasting permits a small company to convey its mission directly to communities that will be drawn to the mission.  That happened for Avalon Natural Products where Morris was brought in as senior vice president of marketing. 

He led the company to eliminate allergens and artificial and petroleum-based ingredients, including parabens, a preservative implicated in breast cancer.  Avalon’s “consciousness in cosmetics” mission resonated with The Breast Cancer Fund, an organization that informs women about the environmental causes of breast cancer. Collaborating with The Breast Cancer Fund and networking with other women’s health organizations and green scientists became a major driver in Avalon’s marketing.  That kind of work, Morris explains, can distinguish a company and create empathy with consumers.

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Morris Shriftman: Episode 59 of The Wendel Forum (27:31 mins; mp3)

Mozart, Inc. website: http://www.mozartinc.com/

American Botanical Council website: http://abc.herbalgram.org/site/PageServer

Tree of Life website: http://www.kehe.com/treeoflife/Home.aspx

Avalon Natural Products website: http://www.avalonorganics.com/

The Breast Cancer Fund website: http://www.breastcancerfund.org/

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Dick Lyons’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/rlyons

We want to remind all of our Bay Area green business friends that this Thursday is the San Francisco Business Times’ annual Cleantech & Sustainability Awards (previously called the Green Awards).  There are a lot of great green leaders being recognized on this year’s finalist list (below).
 
Check out our previous post, which includes the interview with Lindsay Riddell, the cleantech and green business reporter for the San Francisco Business Times.  

 
San Francisco Business Times Cleantech & Sustainability Awards 2011

  • Date: Thursday, June 16, 2011
  • Time: Registration at 5:30, Awards from 6:00 – 7:00 followed by gala reception
  • Place: InterContinental Hotel San Francisco, 888 Howard St., San Francisco

Follow this Link to RSVP:    Cleantech & Sustainability Awards

2011 Finalists:

Cleantech & Sustainability Awards Info & Registration Form:  http://www2.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/event/37371

In Episode 18 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on Green 960 AM radio on June 4, 2011), San Francisco Business Times cleantech and green business reporter Lindsay Riddell talks with show host Bill Acevedo about what’s happening on the local cleantech scene. 
 
Photo of Lindsay Riddell

Lindsay Riddell, Cleantech & Green Business Reporter, San Francisco Business Times

She’s covered the beat since 2006 and during that time she’s witnessed some remarkable trends and growth.  So for this episode, we turned the tables on this seasoned journalist and asked her to answer some questions about what she’s observed. 

The conversation covers a lot of ground, from local companies in growth mode to technologies that have the potential for big impact on the state’s energy demands.  In addition, she’s been following the money and shares some observations regarding the flow of capital – from venture capital to government programs.  She also highlights the current cleantech IPO scene, discussing local favorites like Solazyme and BrightSource.

She offers a sneak-peek at some of the companies to be recognized at this year’s San Francisco Business Times Cleantech & Sustainability Awards (Thursday, June 16, 2011 at the InterContinental Hotel San Francisco).  Thanks to Lindsay for taking the time to share her insights and perspective on the industry.
 
San Francisco Business Times Cleantech & Sustainability Awards 2011

Wendel Rosen is a proud sponsor of this event and congratulates all of the finalists.  We’re looking forward to seeing the following trend-setting companies and other Bay Area green business leaders on the 16th.  Hope you’ll be there too.  Registration info follows in the post links section below.

Finalists:

  • Autodesk Inc.
  • Bridgelux Inc.
  • BrightSource Energy Inc.
  • CalStar Products
  • Choicelunch
  • Cleaire Advanced Emission Controls
  • Clean Filtration Technologies Inc.
  • Driptech Inc.
  • Ecologic Brands Inc.
  • ENXSUITE
  • Genencor
  • Grid Net
  • Hara
  • Intematix Corp.
  • InterContinental San Francisco
  • Numi Organic Tea
  • Pattern Energy Group
  • Primus Power Corp.
  • Project Frog Inc.
  • Propel Fuels
  • Recurrent Energy
  • Simbol Materials
  • Solar Millennium
  • Solazyme Inc.
  • The Gladstone Institutes
  • Tioga Energy
  • Trilliant Inc.

Post Links:

Interview with Lindsay Riddell: Episode 18 of The Wendel Forum(27.32 minutes)

San Francisco Business Times website: www.sanfrancisco.bizjournals.com

Cleantech & Sustainability Awards Info & Registration Form:  http://www2.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/event/37371

Green 960 AM radio website: www.green960.com

About show host William Acevedo: www.wendel.com/wacevedo

Walking to work the other day, I saw a Toyota Prius festooned with advertisements for a local auto body shop.  While I certainly noticed the Prius as I stood waiting to crossing to the street, what really caught my attention was the prominent representation that this auto body shop was “environmentally friendly.” 

What, I wondered, could that mean?  While the Bay Area Green Business Program has worked with auto body shops to help them become certified as a green business, this program doesn’t focus on the marketing message of any particular business.

Since I had no idea what the auto body shop’s marketing message meant, I jumped on the internet to see if I could find an explanation.  What I found was that there were a lot of apparently “environmentally friendly” auto body shops.  As I perused their various web pages and/or advertisements, I became convinced that these auto body shops (and/or their attorneys) had probably never heard of the Federal Trade Commission’s Green Guides

Fresh off of a revision, the new and improved Green Guides attempt to offer understandable guidance for often incomprehensible environmental marketing claims.  The main points of the Green Guides are: 1) advertisers need to be able to substantiate their claims – i.e., they have to have a reasonable basis for making the claim; and 2) the more specific a claim is, the more likely that it will not run afoul of the FTC’s guidelines.  You see, the FTC looks at all advertising from the consumer’s perspective: what message does the advertising actually convey to consumers?  The Green Guides view environmental claims by the meaning that consumers give them, not necessarily the technical or scientific points that the advertiser is trying to make.   In other words, if a consumer could be mislead by the message, the message is misleading.

So, what do you do to ensure compliance?

First, read the guidelines.  They are written in easy to understand prose.  There are a lot of guidance examples, and the categories are broken down by specific types of claims.  The Green Guides and other useful information about the Guides can be found at http://business.ftc.gov/advertising-and-marketing.

Second, common sense should be your guide.  If you do not have competent and reliable scientific evidence, which the FTC views as “tests, analyses, research, studies or other evidence based on the expertise of professionals in the relevant area conducted and evaluated in an objective way by qualified people using procedures generally accepted in the profession to yield accurate and reliable results,” you should think twice about your claim.  It doesn’t matter what you hoped to achieve with your ad, it only matters what the consumer would be able to understand from your ad.

Third, err on the side of caution.  Specific points are advisable over general claims.  An unqualified general claim of environmental benefit may convey that the product has far-reaching environmental benefits, which may not be true (or, at least, understood by the consumer).  So, in the case of those auto body shops, their claims of being “environmentally-friendly” would not be deceptive if that representation were followed by clear and prominent language limiting the “friendly” representation to the product attribute for which it could be substantiated, and if the context didn’t create any other deceptive implications.

Finally, it doesn’t hurt to educate yourself on useful (and not-so-useful) marketing concepts.  A survey released this week of nearly 300 members of Sustainable Industries’ audience, conducted by the Sustainable Branding Collaborative, a Portland-based firm, shows that what most consumers and businesses want is transparency.  Don’t make claims that you can’t support.  A link to the report can be found on the Sustainable Industries website.  Or, you can check out our friends over at BBMG.  They released a 2009 Conscious Consumer Report, which explores the consumer’s confusion and limited reliance on trust marks – labels that attempt to “certify” a product’s environmental attributes.  BBMG has found that consumers cannot readily understand the clutter of the hundreds of trust marks that are in the marketplace today.

So what’s my message on environmental marketing claims?  Say what you mean, mean what you say, and above else, you better be able to prove it.

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