In Episode 96 of The Wendel Forum  (originally aired on April 27, 2013, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Dick Lyons, co-founder of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Terry Hunt, CEO of Wild Planet Foods, which supplies sustainably caught seafood.

 Terry Hunt, CEO of Wild Planet Foods

Terry Hunt, CEO of Wild Planet Foods

In 2000, William Carvalho, the founder of Wild Planet Foods, attended a presentation about overharvesting at the Monterey Bay Aquarium.  According to Hunt, Carvalho had an epiphany then, deciding he wanted to help conserve wild marine ecosystems.  He vowed to never again source or sell fish from an unsustainable fishery.  Today, the company’s albacore tuna, its primary product, is sourced internationally only from sustainable fisheries.

For Wild Planet Foods, being “sustainably caught” is a high hurdle.  Specifically, the bycatch must be close to zero. That is, the company works only with fisheries that “poll and troll” – using one pole to catch one fish, as opposed to long lining.  Also, the fishery’s catch method must not damage the marine ecosystem, and the local fish population must not be under stress or in decline.  Following these principles, Wild Planet Food is rated green by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch.

In addition to serving as CEO of Wild Planet Foods, Hunt is also the founder of Preserve Capital Group.  The boutique investment company’s mission is to provide funding advice for businesses launching a new product.  Hunt works with them to build a business and sales plan.  Past Preserve Capital companies include CleanFish, supplier of high-end sustainable seafood, and SunSpire, maker of natural, handmade confections.

Does sustainability matter to you in purchasing seafood?

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Hunt: Episode 96 of The Wendel Forum (27:42 mins; mp3)

Wild Planet Foods Website: http://www.wildplanetfoods.com

Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Website:  http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/seafoodwatch.aspx

Preserve Capital Group Website: http://preservecap.com

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Dick Lyons’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/rlyons

 

In Episode 93 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on March 23, 2013, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Mark Massara, general counsel and vice president of social responsibility for O’Neill Wetsuits.

Mark Massara of O'Neill Wetsuits

Mark Massara of O’Neill Wetsuits

Massara grew up in Santa Barbara and witnessed first hand the devastation caused by the 1969 Union Oil spill along the coast.  As a result, he decided early on that he wanted to be involved in preventing degradation of coastal resources.

After graduating from law school, Massara joined the Surfrider Foundation (the first non-profit dedicated to coastal conservation) to work on a massive case against pulp mills dumping pollution into prime a surf area.  The case involved 40,000 violations of the Clean Water Act, making it the largest water pollution case in the US at the time.  During that three-year litigation, Massara watched the Surfrider Foundation grow from a few hundred members to 50,000.

In 1991, he joined the Sierra Club, directing the organization’s coastal programs.  In that role, he enjoyed a “front-row seat on the most pressing environmental law questions in the US.”

Three years ago, Massara moved to O’Neill Wetsuits, a company founded 60 years ago.  As vice president of social responsibility, Massara works to protect and enhance coastal resources in the areas where the company does business.  In particular, O’Neill Wetsuits is devoted to teaching children about coastal conservation in the Santa Cruz region.  The company has donated a building, built a laboratory and buses children in for educational programs.

Massara has dedicated his career to protecting the California coastline. In what ways is coastal preservation important to you?
Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Massara: Episode 93 of The Wendel Forum (27:45 mins; mp3)

O’Neill Wetsuits Website: http://www.oneill.com

Surfrider Foundation Website: http://www.surfrider.org

Sierra Club Website: http://www.sierraclub.org

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

In honor of election day (hope you’ve voted), here’s a second post of the day with our recent interview with Spreck Rosekrans discussing the Hetch Hetchy water system and San Francisco’s Measure F.

In Episode 83 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on November 3, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Spreck Rosekrans, director of policy for Restore Hetch Hetchy, a non-profit organization that seeks to transform the Hetch Hetchy from a reservoir that imports water to San Francisco back to its natural state as a valley in Yosemite.Hetch Hetchy

Rosekrans has been an environmental advocate for 25 years.  Prior to joining Restore Hetch Hetchy, he was asked by the Sierra Club to examine whether Hetch Hetchy can be restored.

SFPUC and Hetch Hetchy system schematic

Originally a valley, akin to but smaller than the Yosemite Valley, Hetch Hetchy became a reservoir that supplied water to San Francisco after the City’s early 20th century earthquake and fire.  Soon after, legislation was passed to forbid future reservoirs from being built in national parks. In fact, that actually launched the environmental movement, according to Rosekrans, who notes that’s also when the Sierra Club developed from simply an outing club into an environmental-political organization.

Hetch Hetchy Valley Restored

Hetch Hetchy Valley Restored, artist’s rendering

According to Rosekrans, through improved water management, which might include water recycling and capturing rainwater, San Francisco could eliminate its reliance on Hetch Hetchy water.  But some, (including California Senator Dianne Feinstein) who are concerned about San Francisco’s sources of water and hydropower, are opposed to the restoration. Many of those opponents believe the Hetch Hetchy is San Francisco’s birthright, according to Rosekrans.  Others see it as an iconic dam with symbolic value, making restoration seem radical.  For their part, legislators don’t want to address the issue.  As a result, Restore Hetch Hetchy is taking the issue to the people of San Francisco through Measure F, which seeks to create a public plan that would modernize San Francisco’s water system, including water recycling and groundwater banking (in which cities exchange water with agricultural districts). Measure F would also establish a task force, which would come back to voters in 2016 with specific programs and facilities that would be an alternative to Hetch Hetchy.

While the restoration of Hetch Hetchy Valley would be years in the making, Measure F is a critical component to the restoration effort.  Do you support Measure F?
Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Rosekrans: Episode 83 of The Wendel Forum (27:52 mins; mp3)

Restore Hetch Hetchy’s Website: http://www.hetchhetchy.org

Measure F — Restore Hetch Hetchy’s Ballot Initiative: http://www.hetchhetchy.org/images/Reports/Ballot_Initiative.pdf

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

[Editor's note: Thanks to guest blogger Garret Murai for sharing this news with The Wendel Forum.  Garret is a construction litigation attorney at Wendel Rosen.  He posts frequently on construction issues at his blog www.CalConstructionBlawg.com.]

Construction Partner Garret D. Murai

Construction Partner Garret D. Murai

The Governor’s Office of Planning and Research’s Solar Permitting Work Group has published a guide to the solar construction permitting process entitled California Solar Permitting Guidebook.  The guidebook addresses California laws and regulations, the process for project approvals, and recommendations for improving permit processes for solar installations.

In other energy news, Energy Upgrade California, an alliance of California cities, counties, investor-owned utilities, including Pacific Gas & Electric Company, Southern California Edison, Southern Gas Company, and San Diego Gas & Electric Company, and others, has established a program to help train building professionals in the latest home performance standards, listing in an online contractor directory, and offering connections to clients looking for services.  If you are a contractor click on the link “I’m a contractor or rater.”

In Episode 74 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on August 25, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Jenn Vervier, director of sustainability at New Belgium Brewing Company

Jenn Vervier

New Belgium Brewing Company prides itself on providing meaningful employment for its owners and workers.  It promotes a “high-involvement culture,” in which individuals “bring their whole selves to work” and everyone’s voice is heard.  Specifically, the company engages in participative decision-making, soliciting feedback from top to bottom.  All co-workers are included in strategic planning and business operations, and financial reports are shared monthly with all workers.

But – they don’t forget that business can be fun!  New Belgium Brewing Company is employee-owned, with workers brought into the ownership after a year.  On that anniversary, they also receive a bike.  Once employees have worked there for five years, they receive a weeklong, all-expenses-paid trip to Belgium to learn about Belgian beer culture.  Those are certainly nice perks!

Make no mistake about it, though, sustainability is a guiding business principle of the company.  In addition to donating to environmental causes, New Belgium Brewing Company is also one of the first breweries to publish a life- cycle carbon footprint of its processes for consumers.  Plus, New Belgium is constantly looking for ways to hone the efficiency and limit the impacts of its operations.  For example, the company instituted a new method of dry hopping that saves millions of gallons of water a year, and it also has changed its bottle lubricants to similarly conserve water.  For a beer company, conserving water has a tremendous influence on the bottom line and the environment.

In addition, New Belgium has a 200kW solar PV array, 800kW of cogeneration, which produces electricity from the methane captured from its on-site process water treatment, and 200kW of thermal storage—making cold water or ice at night, off peak, to use in the brewing process and in office HVAC during the hottest part of the day.

Are you more likely to drink New Belgium Brewing Company beer after learning about its core values?

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Vervier: Episode 74 of The Wendel Forum (27:50 mins; mp3)

New Belgium Brewing Company Website: http://www.newbelgium.com/

960 KNEW AM Radio Website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s Online Profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

Construction Partner Garret D. Murai

Construction Partner Garret D. Murai

[Editor's Note:

Many thanks to Garret D. Murai, a partner at Wendel Rosen, for this guest post.  Garret is also author of the California Construction bLawg.  The infographs below can be found on the California  Energy Commission website  in the "News" sidebar.]

The California Energy Commission has unanimously approved a range of energy efficiency standards for residential and commercial buildings to be included in the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24) which will take effect January 1, 2014. 

Building Energy Efficiency Standards — Residential

Highlights of the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for residential buildings include:

  •  Solar-ready roofs.  Roofs will need to provide space for photovoltaic solar or solar thermal energy panels.
  • Hot water pipe insulation.  Hot water piping will need to be insulated to keep water at higher temperature.
  • Verification of air conditioner installation.  Air conditioners will need to be verified by an independent contractor to verify proper installation and efficiency.
California 2013 Energy Efficiency Standards- Residential

California 2013 Energy Efficiency Standards – Residential

 

Building Energy Efficiency Standards — Nonresidential 

Highlights of the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards for non-residential buildings include:

  • Solar-ready roofs.  See residential above.
  • Intelligent lighting controls.  Sensor-based lighting controls, which adjust output based on available daylight, will be required for light fixtures near windows
  • Efficient process equipment.  More efficient refrigeration equipment will be required for supermarkets, computer data centers, and commercial kitchens.

    Infograph California 2013 Energy Efficiency Standards- Nonresidential

    California 2013 Energy Efficiency Standards- Nonresidential

 

Further information on the 2013 Building Energy Efficiency Standards, as well as larger graphics, can be found on the State’s webite.

In Episode 63 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on May 19, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes João De Macedo.  A big wave surfer and author of How To Be a Surfer, De Macedo is also an ambassador for Rip Curl Planet, a foundation that supports causes mirroring the ideals of Rip Curl, a major surf products manufacturer with “a sharpened awareness” of environmental issues.

Joao De Macedo

João De Macedo discusses Rip Curl Planet in The Wendel Forum studio

Bill and De Macedo discuss Rip Curl Planet’s environmental projects, including a labeling initiative, which will be applied to the 2012 Boardshort Collection.  Through the initiative, which is organized by the French Ministry for the Environment, consumers will be informed of every stage in the boardshort’s life cycle, including raw material extraction (energy and resources used), product design (carbon emissions, electricity and water consumed), distribution (mode of transportation, packaging), use (number of washes), and end-of-life product elimination options.

Rip Curl has a history of partnering with grass roots organizations.  For example, the company teamed with the World Wildlife Fund to establish eco mooring anchors that don’t damage coral reefs.  The company has also helped establish world surfing reserves through Save the Waves, which applies the national park concept to preserve iconic surf spots in conjunction with local communities and policymakers. 

Because the market is not always in sync with sustainability, companies must be committed to integrating sustainability into their business profiles; the marketplace’s competitive nature will then overflow into those environmental initiatives, according to De Macedo, who recently earned his master’s in sports management at the Universityof San Francisco.  Already, other surf manufacturers are contributing to environmental movements. 

For De Macedo, activism can be as simple as picking up a piece of garbage from a beach. Big wave surfers, who practice their craft in the environment, can lead by example.  “Go and visit the ocean. It’s the best way to be inspired to help it.”

What are simple things that you have done to help the environment?

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with João De Macedo: Episode 63 of The Wendel Forum(27:12 mins; mp3)

Rip Curl website: http://www.ripcurl.com/

Rip Curl Planet website: http://www.ripcurlplanet.com/

Rip Curl Planet’s Environmental Labeling Initiative: http://www.ripcurlplanet.com/aid=56.phtml

Save the Waves: http://www.savethewaves.org/

João De Macedo’s Book: http://www.amazon.com/How-Be-Surfer-Joao-Macedo/dp/1841262013

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

In Episode 62 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on May 12, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Jeff Jungsten, vice president of Caletti Jungsten Construction, a Marin County-based certified green custom home builder and remodeler celebrating its 25th year.

Jeff Jungsten

Jeff Jungsten of Caletti Jungsten in The Wendel Forum studio

Since 2007, Caletti Jungsten has focused on sustainability.  Green living is a “cultural cornerstone” at Caletti Jungsten, not simply an overlay, Jungsten explains.  The company’s leadership challenges employees to be more efficient and make simple changes like banning plastic bottles from their lives.  Today, 70 percent of the company’s work is sustainable and 90 percent of the management is green certified.  Jungsten says that the company’s goal is to have entirely sustainable projects within 10 years.  Caletti Jungsten also works with its subcontractors to become more sustainable. 

Caletti Jungsten is working on several exciting projects, including a LEED Gold residence in Marin and a South of Market home that is serving as a detailed study of indoor air quality products.  According to Jungsten, customers are seeking healthy homes, which means focusing on air handling and ventilation; sustainable landscapes that use less water; living roofs and walls; grey water and grey water flushing; controlling waste and composting; and low/no VOC finishes. Seeking to be responsible stewards of forests, customers also want to be informed about where products come from.  The result is healthier buildings with higher values.

Legislation can also drive the market.  Caletti Jungsten exceeds California’s Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings in every project it takes on.  Still, green products, materials and systems cost 5 to 10 percent more.  As customers increasingly request them, however, Jungsten believes costs will reduce.  “We don’t have a choice in addressing efficiency issues because we’ll run out of resources,” Jungsten explains. 

Are you willing to pay more to live or work in a more sustainable building?

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Jeff Jungsten: Episode 62 of The Wendel Forum (27:09 mins; mp3)

Caletti Jungsten Construction website: http://www.calettijungsten.com/

California’s Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards: http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

In Episode 53 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on March 10, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show host Dick Lyons visits Natural Products Expo West 2012 in Anaheim.  The show sees 60,000 attendees and more than 2,000 exhibitors showcasing their products including a wide range of natural living products, specialty foods, natural ingredients, supplements, and health and beauty aids.  In addition there are numerous seminars and presentation, as well as informal discussions on topics from fair trade and supply chain issues to organic labeling and greenwashing. 

While attending the Expo, Dick had the opportunity to speak with Sarah Roquemore, Outreach Coordinator with the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), on the topic of palm oil, a product that appears in nearly 50% of the food on your grocer’s shelves and in products as diverse as toothpaste and laundry detergent.

Although palm oil is a widely-used product, most people have no idea how prevalent it is in our food stream. Nor do they realize the environmental impact its cultivation has on our planet.  In recent years, the high demand for palm oil has contributed to the deforestation of many tropical regions.  UCS claims that 15% of emissions that cause global warming come from tropical deforestation (more than all cars, planes, trucks and ships combined).  The connection between deforestation and emissions is not obvious. However, trees can be viewed as big carbon storage devices.  They absorb carbon dioxide out of the air as they grow.  When trees are cut down and burned or left to rot, the carbon they have stored is released back into the atmosphere.  In addition, deforestation has destroyed habitat for numerous animals and leads to loss of biodiversity.

Of course balancing the needs of the supply chain, the environment and local economies in (often) poor regions of the world is a challenging proposition.  But there are some bright spots.  Sarah suggests that there is movement on multiple fronts to address this problem, including promoting changes to the way we grow and produce vegetable oil, local jurisdictional controls on farming practices, and consumer campaigns that have changed the practices of companies who use the oil.

A relatively recent example of a successful consumer-driven corporate shift on palm oil sourcing happened in 2010 with Nestlé.  After being targeted for their use of palm oil from sources of deforestation in a public campaign, led largely by Greenpeace, Nestle has adopted Responsible Sourcing Guidelines. The company has committed to “ensuring that its products do not have a deforestation footprint,” according to its website.

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil is another growing resource in the fight to produce palm oil in a more responsible way. This group actively looks to improve the sourcing options, simplify the distribution channels and verify the supply chain for palm oil.  But it’s a complex problem, and some feel that the group has not gone far enough in establishing guidelines and certifications. 

In the meantime, the Union of Concerned Scientists will continue their program to publicize the issue, taking knowledge to product manufacturers and the public. 

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Sarah Roquemore:  Episode 53 of The Wendel Forum(27:53 mins; mp3)

UCS Report “Recipes for Success: Solutions for Deforestation-Free Vegetable Oils”: http://www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/solutions/forest_solutions/deforestation-free-vegetable-oils.html

Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil website: http://www.rspo.org/

Greenpeace follow up story on Nestle campaign (dated 5/23/2011): http://www.greenpeace.org/international/en/news/features/One-year-after-Nestle-committed-to-giving-rainforests-a-break–what-has-been-achieved/

Nestlé Responsible Souring Guidelines: http://www.nestle.com/Common/NestleDocuments/Documents/Media/Statements/2011-Nestle_Responsible_Sourcing_Guidelines.pdf 

Natural Products Expo West 2012 website: http://www.expowest.com/ew12/public/enter.aspx

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Dick Lyons’ online profile: http://www.wendel.com/rlyons

What does the Iberian Lynx have to do with a bottle of wine?  The Cork Forest Conservation Alliance. 

In Episode 48 of The Wendel Forum(originally aired on January 28, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show host Bill Acevedo welcomes Patrick Spencer, Executive Director of Cork Forest Conservation Alliance (CFCA).

Originally founded in 2008 as Cork ReHarvest, the Oregon-based CFCA is a nonprofit that campaigns globally for the protection and preservation of the Mediterranean cork forests, its inhabitants (including the Iberian Lynx) and biodiversity, through education, direct action, and partnerships with communities, businesses and governments. In addition to the group’s educational campaigns, a major piece of their work is to collect and recycle cork before it reaches a landfill. Bill and Patrick discuss the group’s four main areas of focus, and the new “Real Cork Inside” program.

Recycling

CFCA has developed a distribution network to collect used wine natural corks and recycle them close to where they are collected, thereby reducing the carbon footprint in the recycling circle.  Whole Foods Markets, with drop off locations in their 300 stores in the U.S., Canada and the U.K., is by far their largest partner.  There are many other locations in the network with drop-off locations from Surry, British Columbia to Austin, Texas.  Once collected, the cork is recycled into products including cork floor tiles and numerous industrial and consumer products.

Education

A primary mission of the organization is to educate the wine community, various manufacturers and consumers regarding the sustainability of cork.  The group frequently participates in outreach, sustainability seminars and conferences, and hospitality industry programs to correct some common misperceptions about the harvesting of cork. Cork is actually the bark of certain oak trees.  Patrick explains that, contrary to popular belief, the trees are not cut down in order to harvest the cork. It is harvested by hand by individual family farmers working the 6.6 million acres in the Mediterranean cork forest region. The bark re-grows and is harvested about every 9 years from trees that can live up to 300 years.

Stewardship

CFCA works with local governments and with other nonprofit organizations throughout the world to become a central hub for information, education and advocacy related the harvest of cork.

Environmental business development

To further the mission of the organization, CFCA actively works with companies looking to up-cycling spent wine cork. Using natural cork in other products diverts large quantities of waste from landfills and offers many businesses a more sustainable alternative in the production of goods and products. By working with business leaders in a variety of industries, the group is able to identify new opportunities to create all kinds of environmentally favorable applications – from flooring in schoolyard playgrounds to bobbers for fishing.

The “Real Cork Inside” programLook for the Acorn - Real Cork Inside logo

The “Real Cork Inside” ™ certification program was developed to help wineries let consumers know that they have committed to using natural cork in bottling their wines. Because most wineries put foil or plastic capsule over the top of the bottle, a consumer often can’t see if the bottle uses natural or synthetic cork. Now consumers can look for an acorn symbol on the bottle that indicates the winery is committed to using natural cork closures. This trademark logo is licensed by CFCA to certified wineries in the program and gives the consumer the power of choice.

 

Post Links:

Listen to the interviews with Patrick Spencer:  Episode 48 of The Wendel Forum (27:41 mins; mp3)

Cork Forest Conservation Alliance website: www.corkforest.org

Whole Foods Market cork program press release: http://wholefoodsmarket.com/pressroom/blog/2010/04/06/whole-foods-market%c2%ae-partners-with-cork-reharvest-to-recycle-wine-corks-help-save-mediterranean-cork-forests/

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

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