In Episode 65 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on June 2, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes John Kalb, founder of EV Charging Pros, a consulting firm focused on electric vehicle service equipment systems. The company advises clients – CFOs, directors of sustainability, CEOs, facilities managers and electricians – regarding vendors, installation and other issues related to EV charging systems.

John Kalb, founder of EV Charging Pros

John Kalb, founder of EV Charging Pros

The Obama Administration wants one million electric vehicles on the road by 2015. Kalb believes one way to achieve the goal is for large fleets – Zipcar, Avis and similar companies that purchase hundreds of cars at one time – to switch to electric vehicles.

At the personal consumer level, though, the industry is still in the early adopters phase, primarily because most people have not yet had an electric driving experience. Kalb wants consumers to know that “the fun factor is high.” Bill adds that it’s like driving “a super-charged golf cart.” Plus, without oil, water or tailpipe emissions, EVs require little maintenance making the cost of ownership low.

Kalb notes that pre-purchase decisions usually center on range anxiety, post-purchase concerns usually focus on charging because consumers don’t see options other than their own houses. But Kalb is working to increase public and workplace charging opportunities.

Still, whether the Obama Administration’s goal is met depends not only on the consumer adoption rate but also infrastructure development. Bill and Kalb discuss recent legislation related to EV charging. California’s SB 209, for example, mandates that homeowners associations in multi-family environments can’t prevent individual homeowners from installing a charging station. Network chargers allow the capital cost to be borne solely by the EV owner.

Similarly, AB 631 makes it easier for shopping center owners, business owners and employers to own and operate charging stations. While the cost of charging stations is $6,500 to $10,000, the Public Utility Commission won’t regulate these alternative fuel stations. Usually, EV owners are happy to pay for that amenity and would more frequently patronize businesses with charging stations.

AB 2502, which is under consideration, would permit EV manufacturers to offer consumer financing of the cost (about $2,200) of residential chargers. Needless to say, the California legislature is putting policy in place to foster necessary infrastructure development.

Wendel Forum listeners, we’d like to hear from you: If more charging options were available, would you purchase an EV?

  

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with John Kalb: Episode 65 of The Wendel Forum  (27:45 mins; mp3)

EV Charging Pros website: http://www.evchargingpros.com/

Legislation:

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

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In Episode 62 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on May 12, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show moderator Bill Acevedo, chair of Wendel Rosen’s sustainable business practice group, welcomes Jeff Jungsten, vice president of Caletti Jungsten Construction, a Marin County-based certified green custom home builder and remodeler celebrating its 25th year.

Jeff Jungsten

Jeff Jungsten of Caletti Jungsten in The Wendel Forum studio

Since 2007, Caletti Jungsten has focused on sustainability.  Green living is a “cultural cornerstone” at Caletti Jungsten, not simply an overlay, Jungsten explains.  The company’s leadership challenges employees to be more efficient and make simple changes like banning plastic bottles from their lives.  Today, 70 percent of the company’s work is sustainable and 90 percent of the management is green certified.  Jungsten says that the company’s goal is to have entirely sustainable projects within 10 years.  Caletti Jungsten also works with its subcontractors to become more sustainable. 

Caletti Jungsten is working on several exciting projects, including a LEED Gold residence in Marin and a South of Market home that is serving as a detailed study of indoor air quality products.  According to Jungsten, customers are seeking healthy homes, which means focusing on air handling and ventilation; sustainable landscapes that use less water; living roofs and walls; grey water and grey water flushing; controlling waste and composting; and low/no VOC finishes. Seeking to be responsible stewards of forests, customers also want to be informed about where products come from.  The result is healthier buildings with higher values.

Legislation can also drive the market.  Caletti Jungsten exceeds California’s Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Nonresidential Buildings in every project it takes on.  Still, green products, materials and systems cost 5 to 10 percent more.  As customers increasingly request them, however, Jungsten believes costs will reduce.  “We don’t have a choice in addressing efficiency issues because we’ll run out of resources,” Jungsten explains. 

Are you willing to pay more to live or work in a more sustainable building?

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Jeff Jungsten: Episode 62 of The Wendel Forum (27:09 mins; mp3)

Caletti Jungsten Construction website: http://www.calettijungsten.com/

California’s Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards: http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Bill Acevedo’s online profile: http://www.wendel.com/wacevedo

In Episode 56 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on March 31, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show host Dick Lyons speaks with Paul Baier, Vice President of Sustainability Consulting at Groom Energy.  Paul assists the company’s customers with their sustainability and energy reduction strategies, carbon footprint and responses to supply chain surveys.

Paul Baier of Groom Energy

In addition, Paul authors a sustainability blog called Practical Sustainability and moderates EnterpriseSmartGrid.org.  He is a senior contributor and VERGE Global Advisory Board member for Greenbiz.com and is the primary author of a report on large enterprise smart grid and energy management software called “The 2011 Enterprise Carbon Accounting (ECA) Software Market: A Buyer’s Guide.”  Paul sits at the forefront of issues related to large scale energy use by major organizations.

Dick and Paul discuss how large companies grapple with energy management and reduction – not an easy task.  These companies face many challenging when it comes to energy and carbon measuring, management and reporting.  First, they have to figure out what to track, then how.  Most are responding to regulatory demands, need for better cost savings and what Paul refers to as “consumer compliance.”

Often the first step is trying to put their arms around what energy use really means in their business.  Some companies are surprised that, in addition to improving their sustainability footprint, they can save significant amounts of money by implementing energy management initiatives.  Once they realize that, most are prepared to put significant resources to the task.   For many manufacturers and distributors, powerful companies like Walmart put pressure on them to complete rigorous supplier surveys to explain their strategies and results. 

For single-facility operations it’s hard enough, but many of these suppliers have facilities around the globe, each with different standards, measurement systems, accounting systems and processes for collecting and tracking the information ultimately needed to institute a company-wide program.   Paul helps these companies manage this complex process.  

Helping companies to identify direct effect, indirect effect, and the overall impact in supply chain (Scope 1, scope 2 and scope 3), Paul observes that companies are becoming more sophisticated in identifying the hidden impacts of the entire supply chain. 

Management people have been trying to anticipate cap and trade, carbon tracking, and what will happen as AB32 (in California) and other legislation dictates change for their industries.

As Paul says,

“Energy management is the flip side of carbon management.”

Paul and Dick discuss the types of providers who are stepping into the marketplace and the kinds of risks that various vertical markets must address in their forecasting models. The technologies being developed today will allow greater and greater precision and flexibility in tracking both the carbon footprint and the energy management of our major industries.  And with the rise of cloud computing, the storage and processing options continue to become more affordable for even smaller companies.  Paul suggests that because of the software, data storage and other advancements in recent years, precision energy management is no longer a technical problem, it’s a “willingness problem.”

Certainly the regulatory environmental, as well as consumer demand will continue to influence the willingness of companies to address these issues in significant ways.

  

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Paul Baier:  Episode 56 of The Wendel Forum(27:44 mins; mp3)

Groom Energy website: www.groomenergy.com

Paul Baier’s blog: http://practicalsustainability.blogspot.com/

GreenBiz.com website: http://www.greenbiz.com

Report link: http://www.groomenergy.com/eca_report_summary.html

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Dick Lyons’ online profile: http://www.wendel.com/rlyons

In Episode 51 of The Wendel Forum (originally aired on February 25, 2012, on 960 KNEW AM radio), show host Dick Lyons welcomes Ted Ko, Associate Executive Director of the Clean Coalition, a Palo Alto-based nonprofit organization whose mission is to implement policies and programs that “transition the world to cost-effective clean energy now while delivering unparalleled economic benefits.” Ted is a co-founder of the group and currently oversees policy development and strategy for both regulatory and legislative efforts. 

Photo of Ted Ko

Ted Ko, Associate Executive Director of the Clean Coalition

Ted explains how the group goes about fixing problems and issues facing those looking to build small to medium scale clean local energy projects such as wind farms, biofuels, solar, fuel cells, etc.  Their mission is to help make it faster and easier for these projects to come to fruition.

Dick and Ted discuss energy distribution issues and the Coalition’s position on how to best get the most cost-effective energy to market.  They touch on the challenges of the current energy distribution system, with its long, inefficient transmission lines and the environmental, permitting and construction issues associated with large scale power plant production.  In contrast, Coalition projects focus on small, local projects that benefit local economies. While many projects employ solar PV technology, the program is designed to be source agnostic.

Small projects are generally done on a custom basis, so transaction costs are often an impediment to a project’s success.  By trying to standardize and simplify the contracts across utilities, cities and jurisdictions, the Coalition is focused on simplifying the communication about these types of projects, as well as the process to get them up and running.  Clearly, as smart grid and energy storage technologies come into play, the landscape for energy distribution will change.  The Coalition believes that it’s important for policymakers and lawmakers to get serious about these issues.
In the meantime, the Coalition will continue to push for clean local energy.

For those local and municipal entities interested in launching their own projects, the Clean Coalition has a Local Clean Program Guide that is a free how-to manual available for download on their website (link).  

Post Links:

Listen to the interview with Ted Ko:  Episode 51 of The Wendel Forum (27:53 mins; mp3)

Clean Coalition website:  http://www.clean-coalition.org

Free Guide download: http://www.clean-coalition.org/local_clean_program_guide/

960 KNEW AM Radio website: http://www.960KNEW.com

Dick Lyons’ online profile: http://www.wendel.com/rlyons

[Note: Thanks to Wendel Rosen attorney Greg Jung for this update and guest post.]

Greg Jung, attorney at Wendel Rosen

Greg Jung, attorney at Wendel Rosen

On January 12, the California Energy Commission approved the nation’s first efficiency standards that apply to “vampire” chargers — electrical battery charging systems that consume electricity even when they are not connected to the device being charged or turned off.  The new rules would take effect on Feb. 1, 2013, for chargers used with consumer goods, such as phones and power tools; on Jan. 1, 2014, for industrial chargers, such as forklifts; and on Jan. 1, 2017, for commercial equipment chargers, including walkie-talkies for emergency personnel and portable bar-code scanners.

See http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-energy-vampires-20120113,0,6391528.story

We want to remind all of our Bay Area green business friends that this Thursday is the San Francisco Business Times’ annual Cleantech & Sustainability Awards (previously called the Green Awards).  There are a lot of great green leaders being recognized on this year’s finalist list (below).
 
Check out our previous post, which includes the interview with Lindsay Riddell, the cleantech and green business reporter for the San Francisco Business Times.  

 
San Francisco Business Times Cleantech & Sustainability Awards 2011

  • Date: Thursday, June 16, 2011
  • Time: Registration at 5:30, Awards from 6:00 – 7:00 followed by gala reception
  • Place: InterContinental Hotel San Francisco, 888 Howard St., San Francisco

Follow this Link to RSVP:    Cleantech & Sustainability Awards

2011 Finalists:

Cleantech & Sustainability Awards Info & Registration Form:  http://www2.bizjournals.com/sanfrancisco/event/37371